Colonial Kitchen Design

Colonial Kitchen Design

Next Up Cook’s Dream Kitchen Designer Barbara Gilbert transforms a dated kitchen into an elegant, family-friendly space featuring traditional cabinetry, granite countertops and an oversized island. Kitchen Cabinet Plans Learn where to find kitchen cabinet plans and begin designing the kitchen of your dreams. Cape Cod Kitchen Design Get the info you need for Cape Cod kitchen design, and get ready to create a comfortable and elegant kitchen design in your home. Kitchen Cabinet Design Get inspirational ideas for kitchen cabinet designs as you prepare to create the kitchen of your dreams. U-Shaped Kitchen Design Ideas Explore U-shaped kitchen design ideas, and get ready to add a stylish and efficient design to your home’s kitchen. Kitchen Classic Cabinets Explore options for kitchen classic cabinets, and prepare to create a timeless cooking space in your home. Best Kitchen Cabinets Learn about the style and quality seen in the best kitchen cabinets for your individual home. Shaker Kitchen Cabinets Learn about Shaker kitchen cabinets and get ready to add style to either a traditional or modern home. Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles The design style you choose for your kitchen cabinets determines the tone and style for your entire kitchen. Modern Kitchen Cabinet Doors Modern kitchen cabinet doors are easy with the right information.
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Colonial Kitchen Design

Cook’s Dream Kitchen Designer Barbara Gilbert transforms a dated kitchen into an elegant, family-friendly space featuring traditional cabinetry, granite countertops and an oversized island. Kitchen Cabinet Plans Learn where to find kitchen cabinet plans and begin designing the kitchen of your dreams. Cape Cod Kitchen Design Get the info you need for Cape Cod kitchen design, and get ready to create a comfortable and elegant kitchen design in your home. Kitchen Cabinet Design Get inspirational ideas for kitchen cabinet designs as you prepare to create the kitchen of your dreams. U-Shaped Kitchen Design Ideas Explore U-shaped kitchen design ideas, and get ready to add a stylish and efficient design to your home’s kitchen. Kitchen Classic Cabinets Explore options for kitchen classic cabinets, and prepare to create a timeless cooking space in your home. Best Kitchen Cabinets Learn about the style and quality seen in the best kitchen cabinets for your individual home. Shaker Kitchen Cabinets Learn about Shaker kitchen cabinets and get ready to add style to either a traditional or modern home. Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles The design style you choose for your kitchen cabinets determines the tone and style for your entire kitchen. Modern Kitchen Cabinet Doors Modern kitchen cabinet doors are easy with the right information.
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Colonial Kitchen Design

Cabinet styles are an important consideration for any colonial kitchen design. A range of traditional cabinet options can be a great addition to a colonial kitchen. Relatively straightforward and unadorned, but often boasting a hand-crafted look and expertly carved molding, colonial cabinets may be left in their natural state, stained in a range of colors, or painted. Light stains or colors like white, cream and beige are common choices for colonial cabinets, complementing an overall design that’s often simple, unadorned and functional. Colonial kitchen cabinets are often constructed from the high-quality hardwoods that were commonly available in the original American colonies. Maple, oak, pine and cherry are examples of woods often used for colonial cabinets.
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Colonial Kitchen Design

Colonial kitchen designs take inspiration from the kitchens of the American Colonial era of the 17th and 18th centuries. Spanning roughly two centuries from the 1600s to the 1800s, this historical period was a time of radical change. This evolution of thought was subtly reflected in the design of colonial kitchens. Characterized by a fairly straightforward and unadorned approach to design, colonial kitchens often feature muted, traditional colors, cabinets and furniture constructed from high-quality woods, and fixtures and hardware in metals like oil-rubbed bronze.
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Colonial Kitchen Design

Countertop design for colonial kitchens also reflects a straightforward, efficient but elegant approach, often featuring high-quality, durable materials like granite and marble. For backsplashes and walls in colonial kitchens, some homeowners choose to featuring tiling or wallpaper featuring toile designs or stenciling, each popular during the colonial era.
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Colonial Kitchen Design

The idea of standardized was first introduced locally with the Frankfurt kitchen, but later defined new in the “Swedish kitchen” (Svensk köksstandard, Swedish kitchen standard). The equipment used remained a standard for years to come: hot and cold water on tap and a kitchen sink and an electrical or gas stove and oven. Not much later, the refrigerator was added as a standard item. The concept was refined in the “Swedish kitchen” using unit furniture with wooden fronts for the kitchen cabinets. Soon, the concept was amended by the use of smooth synthetic door and drawer fronts, first in white, recalling a sense of cleanliness and alluding to sterile lab or hospital settings, but soon after in more lively colors, too. Some years after the Frankfurt Kitchen, Poggenpohl presented the “reform kitchen” in 1928 with interconnecting cabinets and functional interiors. The reform kitchen was a forerunner to the later unit kitchen and fitted kitchen.

Colonial Kitchen Design

This palette from Sally Zimmerman, manager of historic preservation services for Historic New England and author of Painting Historic Exteriors, evokes the simple colors of the earth. “The reds during the Colonial period are rust-based,” explains Zimmerman. Iron oxide imbued reddish tones into paint. This red graces the island and hutch, as it might have during the Colonial period. “It was not uncommon for painted furniture to imitate more colorful or more expensive woods than the actual wood used to construct the piece,” says Zimmerman. Painted furniture, both then and now, adds color and style to the kitchen.
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This palette from Sally Zimmerman, manager of historic preservation services for Historic New England and author of Painting Historic Exteriors, evokes the simple colors of the earth. “The reds during the Colonial period are rust-based,” explains Zimmerman. Iron oxide imbued reddish tones into paint. This red graces the island and hutch, as it might have during the Colonial period. “It was not uncommon for painted furniture to imitate more colorful or more expensive woods than the actual wood used to construct the piece,” says Zimmerman. Painted furniture, both then and now, adds color and style to the kitchen. Sally Zimmerman Historic New England Boston, Massachusetts
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Furniture for colonial kitchens follows the same examples as cabinets, boasting quality hardwood construction, intricate, expert carving and natural or light colors. Throw pillows or cushions in gingham, toile or plaids can help add color to the design, featuring traditional colonial colors like reds, blues and greens.
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The kitchen remained largely unaffected by architectural advances throughout the Middle Ages; open fire remained the only method of heating food. European medieval kitchens were dark, smoky, and sooty places, whence their name “smoke kitchen”. In European medieval cities around the 10th to 12th centuries, the kitchen still used an open fire hearth in the middle of the room. In wealthy homes, the ground floor was often used as a stable while the kitchen was located on the floor above, like the bedroom and the hall. In castles and monasteries, the living and working areas were separated; the kitchen was sometimes moved to a separate building, and thus could not serve anymore to heat the living rooms. In some castles the kitchen was retained in the same structure, but servants were strictly separated from nobles, by constructing separate spiral stone staircases for use of servants to bring food to upper levels. The kitchen might be separate from the great hall due to the smoke from cooking fires and the chance the fires may get out of control. Few medieval kitchens survive as they were “notoriously ephemeral structures”. An extant example of such a medieval kitchen with servants’ staircase is at Muchalls Castle in Scotland. In Japanese homes, the kitchen started to become a separate room within the main building at that time.

In contrast, there were no dramatic changes for the upper classes. The kitchen, located in the basement or the ground floor, continued to be operated by servants. In some houses, water pumps were installed, and some even had kitchen sinks and drains (but no water on tap yet, except for some feudal kitchens in castles). The kitchen became a much cleaner space with the advent of “cooking machines”, closed stoves made of iron plates and fired by wood and increasingly charcoal or coal, and that had flue pipes connected to the chimney. For the servants the kitchen continued to also serve as a sleeping room; they slept either on the floor, or later in narrow spaces above a lowered ceiling, for the new stoves with their smoke outlet no longer required a high ceiling in the kitchen. The kitchen floors were tiled; kitchenware was neatly stored in cupboards to protect them from dust and steam. A large table served as a workbench; there were at least as many chairs as there were servants, for the table in the kitchen also doubled as the eating place for the servants.
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While this “work kitchen” and variants derived from it were a great success for tenement buildings, home owners had different demands and did not want to be constrained by a 6.4 m² kitchen. Nevertheless, kitchen design was mostly ad-hoc following the whims of the architect. In the U.S., the “Small Homes Council”, since 1993 the “Building Research Council”, of the School of Architecture of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1944 with the goal to improve the state of the art in home building, originally with an emphasis on standardization for cost reduction. It was there that the notion of the kitchen work triangle was formalized: the three main functions in a kitchen are storage, preparation, and cooking (which Catharine Beecher had already recognized), and the places for these functions should be arranged in the kitchen in such a way that work at one place does not interfere with work at another place, the distance between these places is not unnecessarily large, and no obstacles are in the way. A natural arrangement is a triangle, with the refrigerator, the sink, and the stove at a vertex each.