Chimney In Kitchen Design

Chimney In Kitchen Design

I was having a wonderful time just reading & then I saw the comments section! I was looking forward to gaining an extra 6 sq ft of space on 2 floors of my house by removing my chimney but you’ve got me hyped. I have to get more buckets as I only have 4. When I had my roof replaced this summer the roofers explained they couldn’t wrap the chimney as it was falling apart. In exchange for a wad of cash, I got the plumber to put in a HUGE new hot water heater & the roofers to remove the chimney to just below the roof line so I don’t have to go on the roof. Afterwards I was excitedly telling my dad all the ideas I have after I’ve remove the chimney. He nodded along like he normally does and then simply says, “just make sure you start at the top.” I’m not sure if he thought I wouldn’t or if he speaks from experience. So happy to have found your blog and other kindred souls who post here.
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

Chimneys. When you add a story to your home and have a masonry chimney, you need to eliminate the chimney or build it up (with brick or a metal flue) to above the roof level. This can be a simple decision, particularly if you never use your fireplace or want to convert to a natural gas fireplace. It’s also possible to save a wood-burning fireplace and remove a separate mechanical chimney by replacing older equipment with new energy-efficient units that can vent horizontally (instead of vertically).
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

We removed a full 4 stories of chimney. Our secret was convincing friends that wielding a sledge hammer was super fun. I mean, it is fun…at first. I feel your pain. In fact, I felt it in my arms and back for about a month! Good call getting rid of the chimney. It was odd. If it had a fireplace in it or something but just a chimney…silly. Also, you need to get some paint on those walls ASAP. School Bus yellow doesn’t even look good on School Buses! I can’t wait to see it more done-ish!
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

I just found your blog today, and have been reading through from the beginning. And your chimney/kitchen story just beg for me to tell a story about my grandmother. See, she moved into an old farmhouse with her husband, and he must have been something like your Paul. He got shit *done*. And their house was somewhat like your house, in that the previous owner thought he was handy, but really left a bigger mess behind for my grandfather to clean up. Anyways, she wanted to move the kitchen to the other side of the house, where there was better light. Specifically, she was talking about the morning light that was shining in their bedroom windows waking them up that morning. He didn’t really see the need, but he made the comment, as he got ready to go to work, that if she took down *that wall*, he would take care of the rest. If you really don’t want to do something, you shouldn’t tell a woman who has an idea about what she wants that you will do it. Even if you give her a condition that you think she can’t meet. Especially when she has 6 sons. He came home to *that wall* being all but gone, with just the chimney sticking up. She said the look on his face was one that said he really regretted telling her that. But, she got her kitchen moved!
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

I love the dangling lights – where an I get some of my own? Did they really hate the house? It will in the end be quirky, interesting etc. For now, rip out the innards and spread them over the garden and threaten the rest of the house with the same if it doesn’t tow the party line. I removed a clay pot chimney from our house in France, quite amazing how much rubble it generates isn’t it. We started at the top (logic, see) and dropped stuff in the hole to fill it up, when it reached floor level in the kitchen, we then threw it out the window to be taken to the tip. Lots of trips to the tip. Waiting now to see the floor plan, sans chimney. Fun, fun, fun. Jim
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

LED lighting The inbuilt LED lights in designer hood ensure that you enjoy cooking with bright illumination. With low power requirement and long life, LED lights help in hygienic cooking making it the best chimney for kitchen in this price segment. Intelligent Controls Soft touch electronic push button controls let you select between three convenient exhaust speeds and operate the two powerful LED lights. This push button chimney comes with a smart auto switch off timer that gives you ability to serve your family without having to worry about switching off. Baffle Filter The next generation baffle filter has a dynamic airflow system, which works with high efficiency and helps reduce power consumption. Baffle filter chimneys are easier to clean at home, ensuring hygienic cooking. PDCA Housing A pressure die cast aluminium (PDCA) housing boosts the durability of the Italian motor while minimizing noise generation.
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

I feel your pain. That chimney. That no longer working, smack in the middle of two rooms chimney. We have one in our kitchen. It’s still in a wall – that we want to knock down. You give me hope that ours, too, can be taken down with a lot of buckets, sledge hammers, and anger.
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Chimney In Kitchen Design

You *ARE* getting rid of that powder room in the corner, yes? It’s such a stupid place to have one. I have to assume that they made the ceiling only 8′ to save money, but it just seems like a dumb reason. I would think that if I were spending thousands of dollars on an addition, that I’d want it to blend in with the rest of the house, but I guess I’m not most people (and neither are you). The cut-corners don’t seem that bad, but I am not a fan of the bevel ceiling to match (especially with how the corner powder room ends up looking with all the angles). I do love the antique marble sink, and that antique toilet though (an odd thing to say, but I love old house fixtures and details). I also liked the chimney/brick, but now that it’s gone, I think you definitely made the right call. I will have a chimney demo in the near future, so I’m *really* looking forward to that (not really). What is up with those crazy dangling wire light fixtures? O_o?
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I also liked the chimney/brick, but now that it’s gone, I think you definitely made the right call. I will have a chimney demo in the near future, so I’m *really* looking forward to that (not really).
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In contrast, there were no dramatic changes for the upper classes. The kitchen, located in the basement or the ground floor, continued to be operated by servants. In some houses, water pumps were installed, and some even had kitchen sinks and drains (but no water on tap yet, except for some feudal kitchens in castles). The kitchen became a much cleaner space with the advent of “cooking machines”, closed stoves made of iron plates and fired by wood and increasingly charcoal or coal, and that had flue pipes connected to the chimney. For the servants the kitchen continued to also serve as a sleeping room; they slept either on the floor, or later in narrow spaces above a lowered ceiling, for the new stoves with their smoke outlet no longer required a high ceiling in the kitchen. The kitchen floors were tiled; kitchenware was neatly stored in cupboards to protect them from dust and steam. A large table served as a workbench; there were at least as many chairs as there were servants, for the table in the kitchen also doubled as the eating place for the servants.
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The idea of standardized was first introduced locally with the Frankfurt kitchen, but later defined new in the “Swedish kitchen” (Svensk köksstandard, Swedish kitchen standard). The equipment used remained a standard for years to come: hot and cold water on tap and a kitchen sink and an electrical or gas stove and oven. Not much later, the refrigerator was added as a standard item. The concept was refined in the “Swedish kitchen” using unit furniture with wooden fronts for the kitchen cabinets. Soon, the concept was amended by the use of smooth synthetic door and drawer fronts, first in white, recalling a sense of cleanliness and alluding to sterile lab or hospital settings, but soon after in more lively colors, too. Some years after the Frankfurt Kitchen, Poggenpohl presented the “reform kitchen” in 1928 with interconnecting cabinets and functional interiors. The reform kitchen was a forerunner to the later unit kitchen and fitted kitchen.